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Does My Doctor Think I’m Imagining My Chronic Pain?

Chronic Pain
Photo by Harlie Raethel on Unsplash

If you have chronic pain you’ve probably seen your share of doctors and had your share of medical tests, procedures, and maybe even operations. And yet the pain is still there. Your doctor has told you that she has done everything she can do. And then she recommends you see a therapist. What’s that about? Does she think your pain is all in your head?

You might be offended at the suggestion that you see a therapist. After all, how is a therapist supposed to help a physical issue like pain? But hold on a minute. It’s quite possible that your doctor was not intending to send the message that she thinks your pain is imaginary or that you are a hypochondriac. What she knows is that pain is actually multidimensional. That is, there is more to pain than physical injury. Pain is also influenced by psychological factors such as mood and mood disorders like anxiety and depression. Pain is also influenced by social factors. For instance, how your friends and family react to your pain can play a big role in how you experience it.

Each of the three dimensions (physical, psychological, and social) of pain offer different opportunities to reduce your pain and suffering. Your doctor has done all she can do, but she’s on the ball and knows that there are still two other big areas where your pain can be addressed to your benefit. And that’s why she suggests you see a therapist. This is actually good news and cause for hope: you haven’t run out of possibilities for addressing your chronic pain. And, even better, when you learn how you can decrease your suffering and increase your quality of life, you become in control of your situation rather than being dependent upon medical professionals.

Has your doctor said there is nothing else they can do for you? Even if your chronic pain has been called “hopeless” by a doctor, there IS still hope and plenty you can do to improve your situation. Call or text (816) 226-4678 today to set up a free 30-minute consultation or an appointment.

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